U Came, U Sawed, U Conquered!

u1

You know about Tiffany and his lamps, and how the lamps are put together with copper foil? Well, before Tiffany came along and foiled everything, there was came. Here’s a little description of came. Came 101, if you will.

Came
(noun)
1. a slender, grooved bar of lead for holding together the pieces of glass in windows of latticework or stained glass.

Close, Dictionary.com, but not quite. Came now comes not only in lead, but also in zinc, brass and copper. Maybe other metals, too. I’m not sure. But yes, came has grooves – or channels – that hold pieces of glass together. Or, as in the case of U-came, it can be used as a border to frame stained glass panels.

u3

Came comes in an assortment of styles. There is H came that has two channels and thus looks like an H when viewed from the end. The exterior (face) surfaces can be either be flat or rounded.

U came has one groove and thus looks like a U when viewed from the end. Both H and U came come in varying sizes to allow for different thicknesses of glass, and for different face widths, depending on how you want your seams to appear, and on how much support your glass needs in the case of larger, heavier panels or windows.

U2

Lead came can be cut with nippers, but more rigid material, like zinc, needs something stronger to cut it. I use a hack saw. The panel is soldered together at the joints where one length of came meets another.

Okay, that’s all I came here to explain. I hope U got what U came for.


U  U is for U came.

About Maggie C

Stained glass artist, writer, respecter of life.
This entry was posted in technique and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

11 Responses to U Came, U Sawed, U Conquered!

  1. OK. Now tell us how you solder without heating the glass up so hot that it shatters. Tools? Solder types? Tips on “How to not destroy your glass work in the final steps.”

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  2. Maggie C says:

    Ah… are you experienced in stained glass? You’ve hit upon many “issues” with the process!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Just want to say how much I’ve been enjoying your A to Z blogging. I’ve learned some things, seen some beautiful things, and gotten to know you a little (well, as much as anyone can through a blog). I hope you’ll continue writing regularly when the challenge ends!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Maggie C says:

    Thank you! I invest most of my blogging energy in my other blog, but I am going to try to keep up on this one a little better than I did before the challenge. I’ve enjoyed exploring others’ blogs as well. Challenges are fun!

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  5. Then I will have to check out your other blog!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. No, I am not into stained glass. I am a tool/instrument maker (working with metals and plastic) and could just imagine the problems in working with glass. More power to you and your knowledge of that skill.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Maggie C says:

    Well now I’m even more impressed that you asked that all-important question about how not to destroy the piece after all the effort to stick it together. Good topic for another post!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. The common fear of all creative artisans!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Jz says:

    Very cool!
    Thank you.
    (and happy A to Z!)

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Maggie C says:

    Thanks! Same to you!

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